All posts by Anastim Ducray

P.A.T.M.A.N. and Robbin’

P.A.T.M.A.N. album cover front

Nobody is hungrier for their music to be heard than indie hip hop artists. Whenever I am on the strip in Vegas, I always get stopped and accosted by aspiring rap gods trying to peddle their CDRs. They are out there all day and all night hustling on the streets, like 1920’s newsboys yelling “extra extra!” Not just in Vegas though or on Hollywood Blvd. This sort of thing happens in downtown Scottsdale even. Occasionally I have purchased jams from them, more out of respect for their work ethic than any genuine desire to listen to their music(aside from CD’s being cumbersome to carry, who even still owns a cd player? the number of people is surely dwindling fast.)

Anyhow, this brings me to a hip hop artist known as P.A.T.(no relation to the old Saturday Night Live character.) P.A.T.(whose real name is Pat Fraser) isn’t actually one of those street hustlers. He’s more advanced and sophisticated than that(musically and “promotionally.”) The point though, is that the indie hip hop community is vibrant, determined and interesting while most modern mainstream hip hop is lifeless and dumbed-down. P.A.T.’s 13 song album is cleverly called “P.A.T.M.A.N.(Powerful Artistic Truth, Misunderstood, or America’s Nightmare.”) It’s actually aptly titled, as the album contains each of those elements, and the artist leaves everything open to interpretation by keeping you guessing as to what his intentions and motivations are. At times the lyrics seem typically smug and assertive, but you quickly get the sense that he’s being somewhat ironic, covertly making fun of stereotypical hip hop cliches while knowingly espousing some of them at the same time. The song “Pay Me” is a good example of this: “I hate workin’ for the white man…I’m just playin.’ I hate workin’ period… now I’m serious.” Pat frequently injects humor into his rhymes, with pop culture references coming from left field such as in “Legendary.” I got a chuckle out of lines like “I’m movin’ up like The Jeffersons” and a Wrestlemania (III?) analogy transitioned from a biblical one:

David to Goliath pulling out my slingshot
Hulk Hogan to Andre The Giant with my leg drop

He makes very good usage of samples as well, which provide fishing hook intros to each song, as well as backing to various sections of tracks. As such, they give a refreshingly early 90’s feel to most of the songs. He maintains solid enough production values without veering into overly auto-tuned, shamelessy overproduced pop territory. One thing I would like to see is hip hop artists choosing more obscure samples. It’s too cheap and easy to take a known hook from a classic hit song and basically have a built in, time-tested hook. The best samples should be unrecognizable except to seriously detail oriented movie and music buffs, tv trivia nerds etc. He samples an instrumental portion from “The Look Of Love” (which actually works very well with his song but has probably been sampled to death by now.) I think I detected some Laurence Fishburne dialogue in there somewhere, The album contains a lot of other samples, most of which blend in smoothly with his beats and music unremarkably (a good thing.) Hint: If you want a good Laurence Fishburne sample for your next album grab the one from “Apocalypse Now Redux” where he is singing a Beach Boys lyric.

The songs on this album are very catchy, and the lyrics are quite poetic for the most part. What seems to separate P.A.T.M.A.N. from most other hip hop artists is a self awareness and witty sense of humor about the matter. Even though you can tell he has some street cred and could get tough if he wanted to, he comes off more as a guy you’d want to hang out with and wax nostalgic about vintage Super Nintendo games and 80’s TV than someone who’s going to corrupt your children and radicalize oppressed peoples. His demeanor is just too polite and reasonable for all that. Check out his music. It’s worth a few listens.

http://patfraserrap.bandcamp.com/album/p-a-t-m-a-n-powerful-artistic-truth-misunderstood-or-americas-nightmare
https://inthepatcave.com

Disinterment – Defiled Covenant

defiledcovenant

Released in 2007, Defiled Covenant is an album from longtime (formed in the early 90s) death metal band, “Disinterment.” Defiled Covenant certainly lives up to its name by offering up a satisfyingly demonic sound. The crisp and workmanlike guitarwork has the mark of a refined, veteran metal band. Though this came out in 2007, it has a very classic metal feel to it. If I just randomly heard it, I would have guessed it was from the late 80s / early 90s. It just sounds very authentic and not like a bunch of kids LARPing as a death metal band. Even the vocal effects seem dated in a good way. With song titles like Desecrated Remnants and Desolate Damnation the album almost has a feel of a horror movie opera. The songs are darkly melodic and strangely calming in a spawning hellfire kind of way. The first track, Disintro is like a suspenseful opening of a portal to hell. the album takes us musically on a fast paced, sightseeing tour of the dominion of the damned. It is just a very solid release, as one comes to expect with any decent metal band, features cover art of the highest caliber.

A group which got their start playing underground clubs and venues in the early 1990’s, Disinterment has become one of the more popular death metal bands in Manila. This 5-piece crew is known for their windmill headbanging and brutal live performances. Their longtime in the making album, Defiled Covenant finally came to fruition in 2007. The band’s other musical output consists Demoniacal Dispel and Domination Defied, albums which were released in 2008.

For more info:
https://open.spotify.com/artist/5ylBOSOBazZmSxkYpax0HF
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/disinterment/1448120981